Bobby Allison Family Compound Is for Sale

Jackson Wheeler
6 Min Read


  • A door will close on Hueytown, Alabama’s legacy soon when the home and shop property that once supported the Hall of Fame career of Bobby Allison is sold.
  • The main house on the property once was the home of Bobby and Judy Allison.
  • For many years, it was not unusual for fans to stop at the Allison property hoping to see one or more of the Allison racers or simply to visit the neighborhood.

Hueytown, Alabama always will be known as a racing town if for no other reason than its street signage. Here you can find Allison-Bonnett Drive, Red Farmer Drive and Davey Allison Boulevard—streets named for members of the legendary Alabama Gang.

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Davey Allison, left, along with Judy and Bobby Allison in 1992.

RacingOne//Getty Images

But racing in one of the South’s NASCAR capitals now is more of a memory than a reality. And another door will close on Hueytown’s legacy soon when the home and shop property that once supported the Hall of Fame career of Bobby Allison is sold.

Located on an otherwise quiet Hueytown street—Church Avenue—is the Allison family compound. The main house on the property once was the home of Bobby and Judy Allison. Across the street lived Ed and Kittie Allison, Bobby’s parents. Down the hill and through the trees are Bobby’s former race shop and a small pond he built to provide some fishing relief from work on race cars.

The entire property, owned by Bonnie Allison Farr, Bobby’s daughter, since 2004, is for sale. Five acres, the houses, the race shop, the pond – and the memories.

You can own part of stock car racing history—Farr calls it “hallowed ground”—for $697,700. Not a casual purchase, obviously, but you’ll be traveling in the tire tracks of legends. Every member of the racing Allisons traveled this avenue many times, and the house visitors list includes such notables as Richard Petty and Dale Earnhardt.

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE LISTING, SEVERAL PHOTOS OF THE PROPERTY ON REALTOR.COM

Clearly, there is a certain amount of sentiment attached to the property. The main house, built in 1969, was home for Bobby Allison during the money years of one of stock car racing’s most productive careers. It held countless trophies won on the superspeedways of NASCAR and tiny bullrings scattered across the country. It was where the Allisons gathered for birthdays and Christmases, and it also was home for grieving family and friends after the deaths of Clifford and Davey, Bobby and Judy’s race car driver sons.

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Bobby Allison visited Darlington earlier this year as part of a celebration of NASCAR’s 75 Greatest Drivers.

Icon Sportswire//Getty Images

But, with her 85-year-old father living in Mooresville, North Carolina (where he has been since 2000) and none of the Allison family involved in racing, Farr said it’s time for another family to call 140 Church Avenue home.

“We’re looking for the right family and the right fit to take over this hallowed ground,” she said. “I think everybody understands that freeing me up to be available to help Dad is important. It’s not going to benefit him at all for me to try to hang onto it and struggle to keep it from deteriorating. I can’t give it the love and effort.

“Getting another family to live here is a win-win for everybody. Right now I feel like it’s the best decision not just for me but for him as well.”

For many years, it was not unusual for fans to stop at the Allison property hoping to see one or more of the racers or simply to visit the neighborhood. That traffic now is virtually non-existent.

“The saddest thing about that,” Farr said, “is that when people come through town and stop at a store or station to ask for directions to here, the people running the stores don’t even know what they’re talking about.”

The good times are that far gone.

Bobby Allison’s health has been poor for several years. In addition to numerous injuries tied to his driving career, he hurt his back in a fall on a Dover race weekend two years ago. He lives alone on Lake Norman near Charlotte but is assisted by various members of the extended Allison family.

“With the back injury he can’t do much walking any more, but he’s still hanging in there,” Farr said.

Although several members of the Allison family remain in or near Hueytown, none are involved in racing.

“The family is not really in the racing industry any more,” Farr said. “It’s not like it used to be. Our kids unfortunately didn’t get to live that lifestyle. Life took them in a different direction.

“My four kids have all moved on, and the house and property are too much for me to keep up. I’m 60, and it’s time for me to slow down. I want to enjoy life as I can and be available to go to Mooresville to help if I need to. And I want some time for my own kids.”

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Jackson Wheeler is a skilled editor at Speedofdaily.com, specializing in automotive content. With a background in Journalism and Automotive Engineering, he combines his passion for cars with his writing expertise to deliver captivating articles. Jackson's deep knowledge of automotive technology and his racing experience make him a valuable asset to the team, providing readers with informative and engaging content.
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